Out now: Journal Article: Power on the Run/Macht auf der Flucht

Out now: The current issue of “Zeithistorische Forschungen / Studies in Contemporary History” (3/2018), edited by Nikola Tietze and Bettina Severin-Barboutie focuses on Flight and Migration: Actors, Actions, Contexts.  Julia Eichenberg contributed an article on how European monarchs, politicians, and militaries arrived in London and how these European refugees were accommodated by the British government (“Macht auf der Flucht. Europäische Regierungen in London (1940–1944)”). Article in German, English abstract below.

Queen Wilhelmina addressing the Dutch nation in her first radio broadcast from London, 28th July 1940. (Nationaal Archief, Den Haag/Public Domain; unknown photographer)

Abstract: Some 150,000 Europeans fleeing war and occupation arrived in Great Britain during World War II. Among their number were members of the former European governments, administrations, political elites, armed forces and royal dynasties. National committees and governments in exile were formed from their ranks, seeking to uphold the national sovereignty of their countries despite the German occupation and to join forces as allies to defeat Hitler. They lived and worked in central London in close proximity to one another. In legal terms, most members of the governments in exile arrived in London as individual refugees; they largely left the city as members of recognised governments. A closer exploration of the ›London Moment‹, this formative phase in European politics, questions the supposed dichotomy between power and powerlessness and helps us reflect on flight and those forced to flee. The article looks at the development of the legal status of émigrés and follows four individuals from their arrival as refugees to becoming established in London.



You may also like...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.