Forthcoming: Workshop Report „The London Moment“, 21. – 23.03. 2019

On 21 – 22 March 2019, our project workshop “The London Moment – Exile Governments, Academics and Activists in Great Britain, 1940-1945” took place at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin. The workshop explored political and academic communities and their practices in exile, focusing on the wartime emergence and post-war impact of 1) emigré legal networks and trajectories of their debates, 2) transnational networks transcending East / West divisions, and 3) anticolonial elites and activists.

A workshop-report has been submitted and will be published by H-Soz-Kult (Humanities – Sozial und Kulturgeschichte), the German academic online information and communication platform for historians. As soon as the workshop report has been officially published be H-Soz-Kult, it will be accessible here on this blog as well. Stay tuned!



Cite this blog post
Simeon Marty (2019, May 6). Forthcoming: Workshop Report „The London Moment“, 21. – 23.03. 2019. The London Moment. Retrieved June 13, 2024, from https://doi.org/10.58079/onlw

Simeon Marty

I am a PhD student at the Department of History of Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin and member of the research project “The London Moment”. After completing my B.A. in History (major) and Science of Religion (minor) at the Universities Fribourg and Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne in 2016, I recently graduated from King’s College London with a master’s degree in World History and Cultures. My M.A. thesis “The mouse that roared: The Anguillan secessionist movement and British policy making in the decolonisation of the Anglophone Caribbean, 1966-1971” explores the interconnection between cultural stereotypes in post-war British administration and policy making in the process of decolonisation. In my PhD Project, I will explore the transnational networks that have been established by non-Europeans, especially anti-colonial and Pan-African movements, in London during the Second World War. This research hopes to uncover to what extent the “London Moment” with its extraordinarily high concentration of political groupings and international political actors offered new perspectives for anti-colonial activists and intellectuals in the formulation of social and political alternatives. In a broader sense, it will examine how this has contributed to the manifold processes of decolonisation that followed shortly afterwards.

You may also like...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search